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Galvanizing 108

By Robert Woods
May 07, 2021 Category: Galvanizing

BLOG 8-Robert M. Woods RINSING after DEGREASING So, now the soils are removed for the surface of the work---but there may still be a layer of chemical sticking to it. IF this is coming out of a caustic bath, a direct movement into an acid pickling tank, the layer can actually neutralize some of the acid, wasting it. IF this is coming from an acidic cleaner such as Hydronet, there is no neutralization; but any Hydronet remaining on the surface is also wasted. To remedy these issues, most operations will have a rinse tank after the degreasing tank, either caustic or acid-type. For the acid-type, the rinse can be used to make up for any drag-out or evaporation of the degreasing tankany dragged out degreaser is put back into the degreasing tank. For the caustic-type, the same make up occurs; and the rinse will prevent much of the neutralization of the following acid tank. Control of a rinse tank then makes economic and process sensesaving the more expensive chemicals and keeping subsequent

Zaclon is Born

By Jim Krimmel
April 27, 2021 Category: History

Zaclon is Born! Inspired by the concept of operating DuPonts Cleveland Plant as a standalone small business, the MTP (Management Training Process) team turned its attention to determining what that really meant and how far DuPont would go to implement the concept. The team determined that three key elements which could led to success were: Hiring their own sales force. Incentivizing all employees through a profit sharing and bonus plan. Shedding DuPont corporate overhead costs related to numerous corporate mandates and objectives. Armed with these needs, Joe Turgeon (Product Manager), Stu Schenk (Cleveland Plant Manager), and Jim Krimmel (Cleveland Operations Manager) traveled to Wilmington Delaware to convince DuPont management of these needs and to present the resulting economic projections for the Cleveland plant. The team met with limited success. Sales Force - The MTP team felt strongly that the sales effort being put forth by the DuPont marketing division was too diluted and

Galvanizing 107

By Robert Woods
April 21, 2021 Category: Galvanizing

BLOG 7-Robert M. Woods Last blog was discussing a pure acid degreasing approach, using Phosphoric-acid based product such as Hydronet Base, Ricarica, and S. There is another approach that can be used in some cases, with additives directly into the pickling acid tanks. Hydronet D is the name of our product that can be added directly into Hydrochloric acid tanks at the typical concentrations and temperatures used by North American galvanizers. Acidic Degreasing in the pickle tank Without help, Hydrochloric and Sulfuric acids are not very effective at removing dirt. Hydrochloric acid in particular is poor at lifting greases, oils, chalk, and most other soils. Sulfuric is a little better, but more because it is heated AND attacks scale and rust by blowing off the top layers of rust IF it can penetrate the cracks in the scale. Generally, degreasing with an additive in the pickle tanks is not as effective as a stand-alone tank with SB Clean-Caustic or Hydronet Base or S; however, for

Galvanizing 106

By Robert Woods
April 01, 2021 Category: Galvanizing

Galvanizing 106 As noted in the last commentary, tanks with either sodium hydroxide (aka caustic or an alkaline degreaser) or phosphoric or other acid (acid degreaser) are the two most common cleaning solutions for North American galvanizers. Well talk a bit about acid degreasing in this note. Acidic Degreasing Phosphoric-based As the name implies, acidic degreasing is done using chemicals that have a low pH, below pH of 7. The issue with acid-side cleaning is that strong acids like hydrochloric or sulfuric are poor at lifting soil from the surface of the incoming steel. To combat this, most stand-alone acid degreasers use a different acid, phosphoric acid, as the base for the cleaning. It is not great on its own, though, and so a number of components are added in a very complex balance to get the best cleaning results. Hydronet, the acidic degreaser from Zaclon, is such a balanced effective degreaser. Based on phosphoric acid, it has additives to lift soils, greases, oil, and convert

Galvanizing 105

By Robert Woods
April 01, 2021 Category: Galvanizing

Robert M. Woods SO how do we clean parts if we dont want to use (or only use) mechanical cleaning, or anything but spot-treat with solvent cleaners? Using dip tanks with either sodium hydroxide (aka caustic or an alkaline degreaser) or phosphoric or other acid (acid degreaser) are the two most common cleaning solutions for North American galvanizers. Well talk a bit about alkaline degreasing here, and acid degreasing next time. Alkaline/Caustic Degreasing Caustic is used interchangeably with sodium hydroxide, the primary component in these types of cleaners. The high pH (highly alkaline) solution can react with many oils and greases, particularly natural oils, and since it typically is heated to 135 F or more, the bath is more generally active. Caustic is typically kept at about 10% concentration, by adding fresh caustic solution (50%) or the pellet-form solid. The strong alkaline nature of this bath does make it more hazardous chemically than most of the other tanks in a galvanizer,

Galvanizing 103

By Robert Woods
April 01, 2021 Category: Galvanizing

In the last installment, we looked a little at the broad range of cleaning technologies available to a galvanizer. Picking the right one depends on both experience and a little luck! If the customer can possibly tell you what sorts of cutting fluids, lubes, etc. they use, picking the right way to clean is simpler. For example, if they only use a paint marker, and not much else, then there are at least 2 easy-ish ways to take it off---quick spray of paint remover, then a caustic or acidic degrease will likely take it off. Usually, of course, the steel picks up stuff all they way along, from the steelmaker themselves, to the trucking, to the initial fabrication, to secondary fabrication and storage perhaps outside, then more trucking, and possibly sitting in the snow, rain, wildfire smoke, flooding and mud, even saltwater. At this point there could literally be hundreds of different things on the steel! So, what does a cleaner have to do to all of this crud to open things up for the de-rusting?

Galvanizing 104

By Robert Woods
April 01, 2021 Category: Galvanizing

Robert M. Woods Mechanical cleaning and elbow grease can take care of a number of the soils that end up on the steel as it is processed and transported to the galvanizer, but what about hidden areas, places where rivets or open welds, bolts, and inside of hollow-ware? To get these cleaned up, a chemical dip of some sort is the best approach, whether in the form of a vapor degreasing, waterless solvent cleaning, or full-scale acid or alkaline degreasing in a water solution. Vapor degreasing is effective, but typically for smaller parts---it simply takes a solvent such as acetone, heats it in a carefully closed system until it evaporates, then lets that vapor hit the cooler part and condense. The warm solvent can give excellent cleaning, and properly selected will leave no residue. In some cases the solvent can also be recycled. Downside, though, is keeping the vapors in the cabinet can be quite challenging; plus air permits and the like may be involved. Similar issues appear with

The Dupont Years

By Jim Krimmel
January 14, 2021 Category: History

The DuPont Years (1928 1985) By: Jim Krimmel The DuPont Chemical Company was started in 1802 when a French immigrant, E. I. duPont journeyed to America to manufacture gun powder. DuPonts first gun powder plant was located on the Brandywine River near Wilmington Delaware. Later in the 19th century, DuPont expanded into other explosives like dynamite and nitroglycerin but remained an explosives company until 1902. That year, three young duPont cousins T.Coleman, Pierre S. and Alfred I. purchased the company from their older relatives and began to transform it from an explosives manufacturer into a broad, science-based chemical company. Entry into the paints and coatings industry marked DuPonts first effort to diversify beyond explosives. Nitrocellulose, in addition to being a raw material of smokeless powder, was also used as a lacquer to coat brass fixtures. In 1904, DuPont acquired International Smokeless Powder Chemical Company, a leading manufacturer

Galvanizing 102

By Bob Woods
November 03, 2020 Category: Galvanizing

BLOG 2---Robert M. Woods 8/1/2020 Degreasing is an important step to ease creation of the galvanized coating your customer is paying you for. So what processes are available, and what are the general pros and cons of each? First, let us look at them broadly: Cleaning Type Mechanical Solvent Alkaline (Hot Caustic Alone, 165 F) Hydronet type acid degrease Acid-Pickle (without Hydronet D) Biological Wide Range Soils x x x Carbon Emission x x x Evergreen x x x Productivity Improvement x x Hydrogen free x x x Paint removal x x Safety x x Water savings x x x Then lets look at some of the soils that show up in galvanizing, and how the different types of cleaners that galvanziers use do against them, with 5 being the best. Cleaning Type Mechanical Solvent Alkaline

The Grasselli Years

By Jim Krimmel
October 08, 2020 Category: History

With the startup of Grassellis Cleveland Plant in 1866, the plant began shipping sulfuric acid to John D. Rockefellers #1 refinery which was conveniently located mile from Grassellis plant. But Rockefellers refinery was not the only one in Cleveland. In fact, by 1867 Cleveland had become the unquestioned center of the oil refining business in the United States with fifty oil refining plants. Large quantities of sulfuric acid were essential to wash the gasoline, coal oil, and the other products of distillation. The Grasselli Chemical company prospered. Because of the high demand for sulfuric acid in Cleveland, new sulfuric manufacturing plants soon sprung up including the construction of a plant by Marsh Harwood directly across the street from Grassellis Cleveland plant. As a result of the overcapacity, prices and profits in the Cleveland market collapsed. Caesar and Eugene began to look elsewhere for lucrative markets and built manufacturing plants in New Jersey, Delaware, West Virginia,

Quilon®: Treatment for Leather

By Craig Keeley
August 10, 2020 Category: Quilon

Quilon, Zaclons Chromium+3/Fatty Acid Release Treatments, are used routinely to impart water or stain resistance to tanned side leather or suede. In addition, Quilon treated leather has been shown to have improved lubricity and dimensional stability. For instance, the upper leather of shoes that have been Quilon treated has more resistance to water and or perspiration. Similarly, suede can be treated with Quilon to improve dry cleanability. Garments made from suede that have been treated with Quilon will retain their color and natural softness through repeated dry cleanings. Quilon can be applied either at the fatliquoring stage, where the Quilon will be applied at 10%-40% concentration or in the post fat liquoring stage using a 6%-10% Quilon C or M solution. Quilon is produced from 100% Chromium +3, the safe and essential nutrient form of Chromium. Craig Keeley -Marketing Manager With over 30 years of experience in the chemicals industry, I have developed many long-lasting relationships.

Quilon®: Versatile and Natural Release Treatments

By Craig Keeley
July 02, 2020 Category: Quilon

Quilon, Zaclons Chromium+3/Fatty Acid Release Treatments, have been used in multiple applications since their development in the 1950s. Quilon finds use in the Commercial Bakery as a treatment to paper intended for Pan Liner to additives in printing inks used in Food Contact applications. Quilon also finds use as a treatment to the inside lining of sausage casings to allow faster processing and as the main release treatment for tee shirt appliques. Quilon is FDA approved for use for incidental food contact, as well as, being Kosher Certified. As Quilon contains 100% Chromium+3, the essential nutrient form of Chromium, it is edible. The Chromium+3 in Quilon has been found to help build muscle, reduce fat, improve stamina, lower cholesterol and help regulate blood glucose levels. Chromium+3 is found naturally in soil and is non-toxic. None of the Chromium+3 in Quilon is ever converted to the hazardous Chrmoium+6 version. Quilon treated products, when Quilon is properly applied, are perfectly

Galvanizing 101

By Bob Woods
July 02, 2020 Category: Galvanizing

From the Desk of Bob Woods: Galvanizing 101 Hot-Dip Galvanizing is the process of alloying iron and molten zinc to create a corrosion-resistant alloy coating. This coating protects steel or iron from rust, both as a barrier and with an electrochemical reaction. To get this alloying reaction to happen, though, the steel or iron surface has to be prepared; mostly, this means cleaning off the surface. The things that can be found on the work can include everything from fingerprints to cosmoline-type grease, light rust to heavy scale, and sometimes other coatings such as stencil, chalk, spray paints, etc. All of this has to come off. Most of the time, the grease and other dirt is removed with either a dip-tank full of a degreaser, often an acidic (such as Hydronet) or a caustic (such as sodium hydroxide boosted with SB Clean). The other common cleaning method is mechanical, such as a shot-blaster, grinder, or even a file. The choice of the type of cleaning is difficult, since almost every

Our Beginnings

By Joe and Jim
July 02, 2020 Category: History

The Cleveland Plant is Born! The year is 1836 and an Italian entrepreneur named Eugene Grasselli is eyeing America as the land of opportunity. Eugene had been working in his fathers growing chemical manufacturing business located in France. The industry was in its infancy and Eugene was anxious to strike out on his own. Eugene Grasselli had been educated in Strasburg and Heidelberg where he learned the art of Sulfuric Acid manufacture from his studies while under the tutelage of his father, Giavanni. So, Eugene left the comfort of his home in France, and set out for America. The journey took 5 months, crossing the Atlantic in a small sailing vessel. The trip was perilous but in early 1837, Eugene landed in Philadelphia. He had 2 cents in his pocket. In Philadelphia, Eugene found employment with Farr Kunzie Chemical for $1 per day. While working for Farr Kunzie in Philadelphia, Eugene struck up a friendship with another local chemical manufacturer named DuPont. This friendship would

Potassium Silicate use in Masonry Coatings

By Craig Keeley
July 01, 2020 Category: Specialty Chemicals

Potassium Silicate has been used for over 150 years as the vehicle for Masonry Coatings. When properly formulated and applied, silicate paints will last for decades as they chemically bond to the surface of concrete, stone and other forms of masonry. They are resistant to Acid Rain and provide a degree of Water and Stain resistance. Furthermore, as silicates are alkaline, they are natural biocides. Because silicate-based coatings chemically bond to the surface, they help fill the pores of stone and cement materials providing a weatherproof surface and allows many years before recoating is necessary. Zaclon LLC produces several grades of Potassium Silicate. Typically, we recommend our Zacsil 30 Grade, a 2.5 weight ratio Potassium Silicate for use in masonry coatings. In addition, Zaclon LLC represents our Swiss based partners, van Baerles Inocot series of modified Potassium Silicates. The Inocot series of products provide enhanced stability and formulating flexibility. The use of silicate

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