Galvanizing 101

From the Desk of Bob Woods: Galvanizing 101

Hot-Dip Galvanizing is the process of alloying iron and molten zinc to create a corrosion-resistant alloy coating. This coating protects steel or iron from rust, both as a barrier and with an electrochemical reaction. To get this alloying reaction to happen, though, the steel or iron surface has to be prepared; mostly, this means cleaning off the surface. The things that can be found on the work can include everything from fingerprints to cosmoline-type grease, light rust to heavy “scale”, and sometimes other coatings such as stencil, chalk, spray paints, etc. All of this has to come off.

Most of the time, the grease and other “dirt” is removed with either a dip-tank full of a degreaser, often an acidic (such as Hydronet) or a caustic (such as sodium hydroxide boosted with SB Clean). The other common cleaning method is mechanical, such as a shot-blaster, grinder, or even a file.

The choice of the type of cleaning is difficult, since almost every type of steel and iron can be galvanized; in some fabrications, you might see multiple types of steel, lubricants, paint, etc. The Hydronet acidic degreaser can handle a wide range, as can the SB Clean-boosted caustic; both are easily maintained with simple testing.

Ultimately, the goal is to make it easier to go to the next step in the cleaning (removal of iron oxides, or “rust and scale”). More than ½ the time, a problem in the degreasing tank will lead to issues with the final coating--- bare spots, for example. Degreasing, then, is an important step to ease creation of the coating your customer is paying you for!


Bob Woods- Zaclon Galvanizing Bob WoodsTechnical Director at Zaclon

Since starting with Zaclon in 1990, I have enjoyed the technical challenges of helping our customers solve problems, both as a research chemist and as a technical service specialist. With the expanded responsibilities of Technical Director, I can now help our clients with economic, as well as technical tools for solving the challenges of business. 


 

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Galvanizing 102

By Bob Woods
November 03, 2020 Category: General

BLOG 2---Robert M. Woods 8/1/2020 Degreasing is an important step to ease creation of the galvanized coating your customer is paying you for. So what processes are available, and what are the general pros and cons of each? First, let us look at them broadly: Cleaning Type Mechanical Solvent Alkaline (Hot Caustic Alone, 165 F) Hydronet type acid degrease Acid-Pickle (without Hydronet D) Biological Wide Range Soils x x x Carbon Emission x x x Evergreen x x x Productivity Improvement x x Hydrogen free x x x Paint removal x x Safety x x Water savings x x x Then lets look at some of the soils that show up in galvanizing, and how the different types of cleaners that galvanziers use do against them, with 5 being the best. Cleaning Type Mechanical Solvent Alkaline

The Grasselli Years

By Jim Krimmel
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With the startup of Grassellis Cleveland Plant in 1866, the plant began shipping sulfuric acid to John D. Rockefellers #1 refinery which was conveniently located mile from Grassellis plant. But Rockefellers refinery was not the only one in Cleveland. In fact, by 1867 Cleveland had become the unquestioned center of the oil refining business in the United States with fifty oil refining plants. Large quantities of sulfuric acid were essential to wash the gasoline, coal oil, and the other products of distillation. The Grasselli Chemical company prospered. Because of the high demand for sulfuric acid in Cleveland, new sulfuric manufacturing plants soon sprung up including the construction of a plant by Marsh Harwood directly across the street from Grassellis Cleveland plant. As a result of the overcapacity, prices and profits in the Cleveland market collapsed. Caesar and Eugene began to look elsewhere for lucrative markets and built manufacturing plants in New Jersey, Delaware, West Virginia,

Quilon®: Treatment for Leather

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Quilon, Zaclons Chromium+3/Fatty Acid Release Treatments, are used routinely to impart water or stain resistance to tanned side leather or suede. In addition, Quilon treated leather has been shown to have improved lubricity and dimensional stability. For instance, the upper leather of shoes that have been Quilon treated has more resistance to water and or perspiration. Similarly, suede can be treated with Quilon to improve dry cleanability. Garments made from suede that have been treated with Quilon will retain their color and natural softness through repeated dry cleanings. Quilon can be applied either at the fatliquoring stage, where the Quilon will be applied at 10%-40% concentration or in the post fat liquoring stage using a 6%-10% Quilon C or M solution. Quilon is produced from 100% Chromium +3, the safe and essential nutrient form of Chromium. Craig Keeley -Marketing Manager With over 30 years of experience in the chemicals industry, I have developed many long-lasting relationships.

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